CPB Curriculum Competencies

The CPB curriculum focuses on seven primary competencies of medical billing:

  • Types of Insurance: Students learn how managed care systems work, and how to distinguish between and work with different commercial (Blue Cross/Blue Shield) and government (Medicare and Medicaid) providers. Other related issues include Medigap, worker’s compensation, and third-party payers.
  • Billing Regulations: Instruction is provided on the four major federal billing and coding policies, including Accountable Care Organizations (ACO). In addition, students also learn how to properly fill out major billing forms like the CMS1500 and UB04e.
  • Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Compliance: In addition to learning about HIPAA‘s privacy and billing provisions, students learn how to prevent fraud and abuse, as well as proper methods for retaining medical records.
  • Reimbursement and Collections: Issues related to this aspect of billing include compliance with collections laws and strategies for working with collections agencies and bankruptcy courts.
  • Billing: Submitting electronic claims, retaining records, tracking claims, handling denials and appeals and auditing the process are all covered in this section.
  • Coding: CPB students receive instruction on different coding systems, such as the CPT, ICD-9-CM and HCPCS Level II.
  • Case Analysis: Students are schooled and tested on how to apply the core competencies to a real world situation.

Course Expectations

Once students receive their course materials (textbooks, video lectures, etc), they should expect to spend roughly 80 clock hours completing the online course, which must be finished within four months. The program is comprised of 16 individual modules; each section concludes with a review exam. Upon receiving a passing grade on the final exam, a certificate of completion, which may also serve as continuing education credit, is provided.

Successful graduates should be prepared to take the CPB exam and begin looking for jobs upon attainment of the certificate. Most certified billers find work in doctor’s offices, clinics, and other healthcare facilities. Others choose to continue their education and pursue a Certified Professional Medical Auditor (CPMA) or Certified Professional Compliance Officer (CPMCO) certificate.

Even the best program can be a waste of time and money if the curriculum doesn’t match the student’s career goals and preferences. Before jumping into a medical billing certificate program, be sure to research other options to ensure that particular educational path is right for you.

Additional Resources

  • What Does a Career In Medical Billing Look Like?

    #1: Where Do Medical Billing Professionals Work? While medical billing is a highly specialized career, professionals in the field work in a variety of settings. Many find positions in offices, away from the action of a hospital, while others work in much more clinical settings. Increasingly, medical billing professionals are being encouraged to work remotely…

  • Curriculum

    CPB Curriculum Competencies The CPB curriculum focuses on seven primary competencies of medical billing: Types of Insurance: Students learn how managed care systems work, and how to distinguish between and work with different commercial (Blue Cross/Blue Shield) and government (Medicare and Medicaid) providers. Other related issues include Medigap, worker’s compensation, and third-party…

  • Exam Prep

    Exam Prep Students preparing for the Certified Professional Biller (CPB) exam need all the practice they can get. Consisting of 200 questions to be correctly answered in 5.66 hours, candidates want to have the answers on the tip of their tongue if they want to pass the test on the first try. To help…

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